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Engaging in Meaningful and Respectful Conversations Online Facebook Live Notes

We’ve all seen some unpleasant online interactions – from the comments on YouTube videos to controversial FB posts – and we know that our students spend a lot of time on social media… but what are we doing to teach them about engaging meaningfully and respectfully in these online spaces? During this FB live session, we will share strategies, tips and resources for both teachers and parents! For teachers, we’ll highlight exactly what you can do in the classroom; and for adults in general (teachers, parents, family members), we’ll share some tips for how you have these important conversations with the children and teenagers in your lives. What are you curious about? View the Facebook Live here

Show Summary:

Respectful and Meaningful Conversations in Online Spaces

  1. What you can do with students
    1. Practice: Prioritizing Comments as Conversation
    2. Recognize Resilience: Learning about how to recover from mistakes
    3. Explore Role Models (and be one too!)
  2. What you can do as an adult – either as a teacher or a parent
    1. Value their spaces too – it’s a valid place to socialize
    2. Social media has social norms too!
    3. Be a role model!

Most importantly: teaching and learning about engaging respectfully online is not a one-off, always take advantage of every opportunity to “tuck” this stuff in – all of us can use reminders about this whenever we get the chance!

Today’s Resources

Show Notes:

What you can do as a teacher:

  1. Practice: Prioritizing Comments as Conversation (from our blog post & freebie this week):
    1. Start with a conversation about comments vs compliments
      1. T-chart to determine the difference
      2. Comment sandwich to highlight how to “sandwich” a comment between two compliments
    2. Comment on shared reading within your classroom:
      1. Read a passage in Google Docs and ask students to leave comments & reply to each other to start a dialogue – this can be done with sticky notes too – reflect on and share thinking about the commenting process
      2. This can be done in a variety of levels:
        1. reading silently alone – each student reads the google doc with no edits or commenting (view only),
        2. reading silently together, – each student reads the google doc as a view only, makes a copy and add comments on their own, after a defined time, bring comments over to shared google doc (now changed to can comment), after they have  set amount of time to bring their comments over, give them a set amount of time to respond
        3. reading together – each student reads one google doc, with comments open, comment as they read – this can be merged with the strategy above by setting time segments for “reading only”, “commenting only” and “responding to comments only”
        4. Recommend you try all three levels and then discuss
    3. Comment within and beyond your classroom by using twitter and blogs:  
      1. Blog with your students –
        1. start simple with the #comments4kids hashtag on Twitter,
        2. or you can create a teacher blog and have students comment there,
        3. have students have their own blog & comment on each other
        4. Create a class rubric for meaningful comments 
          1. Commenting rubric we use in COETAIL (easily adapted for students)
          2. Sample blogging rubric that also includes commenting / community interaction
      2. Create digital pen pals through ePals or Skype
    4. Beyond just comments, discussing and reflecting on how we behave in online spaces, particularly how we react
      1. Scenarios: have kids write their own scenarios – what if this happens, what would you do – could be played out digitally or in real life
      2. Depending on the comfort level of your classroom, you could have students bring in examples from their social media spaces (with no names attached) and analyze the choices that were made and maybe how they could be handled in an ideal situation
      3. Kim’s recent blog post: Dealing with Digital Confrontation
  1. Recognize Resilience: Learning about how to recover from mistakes
    1. we always preach think before you post, but the reality is that they will make mistakes and that’s ok. When have they seen others making mistakes and what did they do to recover?
    2. how do we give kids opportunities to recover from making mistakes online – do we give them opportunities to fail (could be useful with the scenarios)
  1. Explore Role Models (and be one too!)
    1. Ask students to share some of their favorite role models and examine / explore their online profiles to see what they share, how they share it and if they’ve made good decisions
    2. Be open to the possibility that you could be a role model for your students too – many teachers opt not to share their lives online with students, but if you’re willing to give it a try (even if it’s a limited profile), you could be one of the few adults in their lives that would like to meaningfully engage about being social online

What you can do as an adult – either as a parent or a teacher:

  1. Value their spaces too – it’s a valid place to socialize
    1. We tend to think that spending time online is automatically a waste of time, but for many of our students / children it may be the only “free” time they get to spend with their friends without adult supervision (from their overly scheduled lives, to the fear of letting kids “go out and play”, research shows that students have much less time alone with their friends than we did when we were kids – this is their only option (and we sent them there)
  2. Social media has social norms too!
    1. understand new social norms in digital spaces are developed just like the ones we created (only their norms are different),
      1. including experience having talked to students, what do they say,
      2. Articles: Rules for Social Media, Created by Kids (NY Times), Like, Flirt, Ghost: A Journey Into the Social Media Lives of Teens (Wired), Teens: Redefining Norms (Physchology Today)
  3. Be a role model!
    1. If you’re open to sharing parts of your life online consider not just being the “perfect” example of no mistakes, but also explain choices, sharing mistakes & how you recovered

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